Archive for the ‘History’ Category

  • Brasília Palace Hotel

    Jul 5, 18 • Marion • Gastronomia, History, TopicsNo CommentsRead More »

    The Brasília Palace Hotel was the second building to be finalized in the new capital. Contruction works started in September 1957 and the hotel, originally named Hotel de Turismo, was inaugurated on June 30, 1958, the same day as the Palácio do Planalto. At that time, it had been decided that no other building of the new capital could be inaugurated before the presidential palace. It was the principal place to host the authorities coming to Brasília to watch the construction works going on. The building was designed by Oscar Niemeyer, and possesses two artworks of Athos Bulcao: a huge outdoor tiled wall and a panel in the banqueting-hall (the former dining hall).                             With 13.000 covered square meters, the hotel was projected with a length of 160 meters and 3 floors. Composed of a metal structure, it was the first construction work using steel “Made in Brazil”. In total, 905 tons of nationally produced steel were needed. The hotel also was the first in Brazil equipped with air-condition. The banqueting-hall „Athos Bulcao” received great artists like Chico Buarque, Elis Regina, Toquinho and Vinicius de Moraes. The music “Água de Beber” was performed in the hotel bar for the first time, in 1959. Half of the hotel’s capacity hosted the American Embassy for about 10 months, from May 1960 till

  • Tiradentes – April, 21 – Brasilia’s Birthday

    Apr 21, 18 • Marion • HistoryNo CommentsRead More »

    Tiradentes and the Inconfidência Mineira In the last quarter of the 18th century, Vila Rica de Nossa Senhora do Pilar do Ouro Preto was a dynamic place. Gold had brought great wealth to the city and this was translated into fine religious and secular buildings. Much of the artistry that went into these constructions and their decoration was home-grown, such as the genuis of O Aleijadinho. In conjunction with this flowering of the arts an intellectual society developed. And yet all this went on under the heavy hand of the Portuguese crown, which demanded its fifth share (the quinto), imposed punitive taxes and forbade local industries to operate. While the artists and artisans could not travel and had to seek inspiration in what was around them, the intellectuals were often from families who sent their young to Europe to further their education. So, when the gold yields began to decline and the Portuguese demands became even more exorbitant, some members of society began to look to Europe and North America for ways to free Minas Gerais from the crown. One side of the argument was the view of the governor, the Visconde de Barbacena, who refused to admit that the mines were exhausted and that poverty was beginning to affect the community. As far as he was concerned, there was no gold because it was being smuggled out of the

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